Quotes

Strength.

“Often, we are in awe. I think we look at these people as lucky, when in fact, luck has nothing to do with it. It is really all about the strength of their imagination; it is about how they constructed the possibilities for their life. In short, unlike me, they didn’t determine what was impossible before it was even possible.”
-Debbie Millman

[read the full feature article on her speech at BrainPickings.org]

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Quotes

beauty.

“A woman is beautiful when she’s loved, and only then. ” -Job Skeffington

“Nonsense. A woman is beautiful when she has eight hours’ sleep and goes to the beauty parlor every day. And bone structure has a lot to do with it too.” -Fanny Skeffington

Mr. Skeffington (1944)

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Quotes

love holds faith.

“Oh, how stubbornly does love — or even that cunning semblance of love which flourishes in the imagination, but strikes no depth of root into the heart — how stubbornly does it hold its faith until the moment comes when it is doomed to vanish into thin mist! Giovanni wrapped a handkerchief about his hand and wondered what evil thing had stung him, and soon forgot his pain in a reverie of Beatrice.”

   – Nathaniel Hawthorne, Rappaccini’s Daughter 

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Quotes

A witty woman is a treasure; a witty Beauty is a power.

“We shall then set a price on the ‘unusual combination.’ A witty woman is a treasure; a witty Beauty is a power. Has she actual beauty, actual wit? –not simply a tidal material beauty that passes current any pretty flippancy or staggering pretentiousness? Grant the combination, she will appear a veritable queen of her period, fit for homage; at least meriting a disposition to believe the best of her in the teeth of foul rumor; because the well of true wit is truth itself, the gathering of the precious drops of right reason, wisdom’s lightning; and no soul possessing and dispensing it can justly be a target for the world however well-armed the world confronting her.”
-George Meredith, Diana of the Crossways 

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Life., Quotes

we could and we did. and we love it.

“They found us vandals. In our dining-room, as in all the other rooms of our house, we have fine, deeply recessed windows. We lined the sides and the tops of the recesses with sheets of mirror. The effect, I mean to us, is lovely; the orchard lies beyond the dining-room, and its trees seem to stand up in the mirrors at the sides, and its boughs and leaves look down from the mirrors at the top. But this was regarded as desecration. ‘Those old windows,’ they cried. ‘Oh, how could you?’ Well, we could and we did. And we love it.”

Excerpt from Destructive Decoration, by Dorothy Parker

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